i don't care about your blog.

Dayglo Reflection

Rest in peace, Bobby Womack.

In my teenage years up through my late twenties I used to shoot photographs on one of those standard army-issue, grade A, 100-percent no-filler Pentax 35 mm cameras. Until the fateful day when I got my prints back from the photo shop (that’s what the ancients referred to as a physical location that would chemically develop what were called “photographs” and not the popular computer program of the same name you stole from your roommate’s workplace) and inside the envelope of my developed photos of a recent family trip was a note saying, “Hey Jack, I just wanted to let you know that I’m a big fan…” That was the last time I took photos in to be developed.

I decided to switch to Polaroid film from then on. It was instant, private and, I would later learn, could be manipulated in incredibly creative and gorgeous ways if you put your mind to it. I have a fondness for putting my mind to things like grindstones, so I started searching for and collecting all types of models of Polaroids—land cameras, “goose” models (the “600 SE”), passport cameras (I’ve got a lot of those), pinhole cameras, even an endoscopic Polaroid. I found exotic adaptors and lenses from Japan and from antique stores. Then, I started to experiment with “in-camera” multiple exposures; they’re done by using a sly trick that manipulates the camera into not ejecting the film, which most Polaroids are built to do in the post-land-camera years. At any rate, I’ve never gotten a digital camera, though it is pretty slick how portable they are and what nice pictures you can get from them. One drag about them, though, is that you hardly ever see anyone make actual prints from their digital cameras; they just end up being seen on computer screens and Facebook, it seems, or people have the photos on their phone until they break or lose the phone and then they usually have to start all over again. I like giving photos to people. You hardly ever hear of people making a photo album anymore, either. I used to love looking through photo albums as a child and trying to guess what the people in the pictures were saying when the photo was taken. Like silent home movies, old photos—especially black-and-white shots—seem to take on an air of romance for some reason. Probably because it’s nice for our brains to not have all the information, to have to use our imagination. I once won a Kodak disc camera in the ’80s as a prize in a fall festival contest. Those were a hoot for a hot minute, but such tiny negatives.

Well, here are a few pictures I took recently and a couple I found in my hermetically-sealed titanium shoebox under the bed. Any wild effects you see were done inside the Polaroid camera and not added later in post. Only contrast was put on the scans as I wasn’t sure if they knew how dark to print the blacks in the photos for a print magazine. I’d like to put out a book of all of the multiple exposure Polaroids I’ve taken over the years some day; maybe this will help me start putting it together in my spare time…or, at the very least, to take digital images of all of these real photos and start up a Facebook page. I’ll decide later.

Jack White

III

My hero.

(Source: filtermagazine.com, via fuckyeahjackwhite)

I am often asked by young artistic types, when I have the pleasure of meeting them at conventions, after a performance, or on the street, for advice in seeking a life in the circus as I have for over a decade now. I struggle for the eloquence to share with them my thesis on how to lead a full, sane life while continuing to fight the artistic fight and stay afloat in a costly, even unkind world.

My dear friend, Thomas Constantine Moore, is about to graduate from Carnegie Mellon University. When I watched the attached lecture, I was overwhelmed by the worldly perspective he managed to condense into a humorous 17 minutes. This guy is going to take the world by storm. And if you take these words to heart, maybe you will, too.

Ladies and gentlemen, J’oie d’aventure. 

To keep up with Mr. Moore’s imminent success, follow him here on Tumblr or here on Twitter.

chastitybites:

kaidonovskied:

MARVEL WOMEN present:

"My feminism will be intersectional or it will be bullshit"
Flavia Dzodan 

Amen, sisters!

(Source: robowings)

chastitybites:

¡Feliz #DiadelosMuertos! TODAY #ChastityBites releases on most VOD platforms!! This has been a long time coming… We hope you check it out and enjoy!

chastitybites:

¡Feliz #DiadelosMuertos! TODAY #ChastityBites releases on most VOD platforms!! This has been a long time coming… We hope you check it out and enjoy!

fingerstakeall:

LOSERS TAKE ALL, starring Kyle Gallner and Allison Scagliotti is proud and surprised to be one of ten iTunes hand-picked movie suggestions in their Weekend Movie Guide! Please show your support by renting or buying tonight!

iTunes pick!

fingerstakeall:

LOSERS TAKE ALL, starring Kyle Gallner and Allison Scagliotti is proud and surprised to be one of ten iTunes hand-picked movie suggestions in their Weekend Movie Guide! Please show your support by renting or buying tonight!

iTunes pick!

fingerstakeall:

Brian (KYLE GALLNER) and Simone (ALLISON SCAGLIOTTI) get to know one another in LOSERS TAKE ALL. Order now on iTunes!

There’s more where this came from.

fingerstakeall:

Brian (KYLE GALLNER) and Simone (ALLISON SCAGLIOTTI) get to know one another in LOSERS TAKE ALL. Order now on iTunes!

There’s more where this came from.

about Losers Take All
WNYC radio Soundcheck / John Paul Keith & Alex Steyermark

fingerstakeall:

Listen to Memphis rocker John Paul Keith and director Alex Steyermark talk about the new movie Losers Take All and 80s indie/punk rock on WNYC’s “Soundcheck”

1,431 plays